Our Examples of “Enviable” Workplace Culture

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While a top-notch workplace culture is enviable, it also sets an example for what other organizations should strive to achieve. Tim Stevens wrote in his FastCompany article, “There is nothing worse than working in an organization that has a bad culture. It doesn’t matter how much money you make or how many weeks of vacation you are given; when you work in a toxic environment, you still come home tense and stressed at the end of each day.” Stevens is on point; I felt miserable on a daily basis during one of my first “real” job experiences (and no, it wasn’t at The Motley Fool).

Stevens goes on to list 12 traits that suggest your organization is among those with a fantastic culture. Here are a few that resonate with our organization:

1. Turnover is Low.

We want our employees to be Fools for life. Our turnover rate is less than 2%, which is remarkable by industry standards. We go to great lengths to ensure Fools’ happiness, whether it’s ordering gluten-free pizzas to celebrate monthly birthdays or building out more quiet spaces in our office. Foolish coaches also hold regular “Happiness Check-Ins” to chat with Fools about their work-life balance. Low employee turnover means you’re at least doing something right.

 

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2. Team Members are Energized by the Mission.

Fools are passionate about our mission – “To Help the World Invest – Better.” You can feel the energy here, as well as from Fools all over the world. We have full-time Fools based in Canada, Germany, Australia, and Singapore that are all working passionately toward the same goal. When Fools are excited about projects, productivity levels rise to new heights. Creativity can also inflate, adding more valuable ideas to the mix.

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3. It’s Not Just a Job.

Fools are not only excited to come to work, but they’re also enthusiastic about Foolish extracurriculars. Fools are friends too, so attending happy hours, concerts, plays, and other cultural events in the area aren’t foreign concepts. In fact, we actually enjoy spending time with our coworkers. We’re not running toward the door to exit right at 5PM (…we do have a flexible schedule), and it’s kind of refreshing from the corporate norm. A work environment is definitely more positive when it has this type of ambience.

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4. People are Smiling. 

Fools are shiny, happy people (and some are music lovers, too). Our Office Ops team does a great job of keeping FoolHQ an upbeat environment. These creative Fools host activities to all scales, from smaller touches like pushing around snack carts to planning larger events including our annual Holiday Party and company retreat called Foolapalooza.

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5. Communication is Strong.

Though communication can always be enhanced, The Motley Fool strives to keep our conversations transparent. It’s important that your employees stay on the same page with what’s relevant, be it your company numbers or external conference opportunities. Fools are happier when information is provided instead of hidden, even if something is in the works. Simply stating “We’re working on it, but we wanted to let you know…” can make all the difference.

Interested in checking out the other qualities that make a workplace enviable and one of a kind? Click here to read more.

Employee Engagement Matters

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After uploading a new Foolosophy video on the importance of Foolish recognition, we were delighted to see a sweet shout-out from our friends at YouEarnedIt. We implemented their employee engagement tool last year and Fools have been big fans since day one. This online app allows Fools to recognize fellow coworkers for jobs well done with “gold,” which can later be cashed in for prizes. So what’s in our YouEarnedIt redemption vault? Some pretty amazing stuff like Amazon gift cards, subscriptions to BarkBox and Beer of the Month Club, SouthWest Airlines vouchers, and much more! High-value rewards include a trip to our FoolUK office in London and a 3 day weekend in NYC for two.

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While these prizes are awesome, it’s the reason behind why Fools give gold that really matters. Even the little tasks deserve recognition, and now we can thank fellow Fools through YouEarnedIt. A public feed is active all day long so that we can keep up with the great work Fools are doing all over the world. In just a year, nearly 13,000 pieces of recognition have been sent – wow!

Receiving and sending gold excites Fools, plus our prizes inspire everyone to work even harder. Happy employees lead to a more engaged work environment and that’s what we’re all striving for, right?

Sharing Strategies with Glassdoor

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We’re featured on Glassdoor’s Recruiting Blog today to share our top 5 strategies for how to be a better place to work. We spill (some) of our secrets for enhancing employee engagement, company transparency, and workplace culture. You don’t want to miss out, so click here to read our tips!

Do you have any advice that can help organizations improve for the better? Please share below, and don’t forget to Fool On!

 

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GLASSDOOR NAMES US THE BEST MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY TO WORK FOR IN THE US (AGAIN!)

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Have you heard the exciting news? Glassdoor has named us the #1 company to work for in America – for the second year in a row! Out of more than 125,000 companies eligible to win, The Motley Fool was ranked highest by those who know best – our Foolish employees.

Winners were determined based entirely on accurate and approved company reviews submitted to Glassdoor between November 13, 2013 and November 2, 2014. All of the reviews remain absolutely anonymous, and The Motley Fool took the top spot on the list for companies with fewer than 1,000 employees.

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What makes a company the best place to work? Besides a motivating company mission, employee engagement and workplace culture are also major factors. Head People Fool Lee Burbage adds,”We don’t believe perks drive our employee engagement, but feeling like your leadership team cares about you and what you want or need to be happy does drive engagement.” Our CEO Tom Gardner and a few other Fools share more in this exciting video:

 

Thanks to Fools near and far that contributed to our success. Fool On!

Coffee Brews Conversation

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I hear a lot of chatter about coffee at FoolHQ, but the buzz doesn’t always revolve around the need for caffeine. As an opportunity to connect, Fools are encouraged to request Starbucks gift cards sponsored by The Motley Fool. In return, Fools must treat a fellow coworker – ideally one they don’t know well – to a drink. Though there’s definitely a monthly card limit, some Fools don’t mind to fund Starbucks runs on their own dime every once in a while. You could say that coffee meetings are a popular part of our culture, to say the least.

Our CEO Tom Gardner envisions more to this benefit than just a free soy latte. Introducing the idea at a company-wide huddle last year, Tom encouraged using the cards as a chance to learn about others’ projects; identify best practices Fools use; and collaborate on challenges or ideas. Fool Amy Dykstra approximates that she hands out around 10 gift cards per month.

Jerry Seinfeld also recognizes room for great communication in a cup of coffee. In fact, it’s the focus of his successful Emmy-nominated web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. Seinfeld explains, “…why it’s great to meet someone for a cup of coffee — the ease, the simplicity, the compactness. And that it also obviously gets people talking. You have coffee and for some reason it makes you talk a lot.” Whether or not you order coffee, tea, or a glass of water, it’s the conversation that counts.

While Jerry Seinfeld hosts his guests in cars, Tom and David Gardner hold a monthly event at FoolHQ called “New Fool Coffees.” Spending an hour together with our founders, recent hires are able to learn more about our company and ask tons of questions. Conversations can travel anywhere from Tom’s favorite drink to what inspired his team’s latest stock pick. Starbucks – or FoolHQ conference rooms – are hot spots for Fools, but the location shouldn’t stop you from incorporating this idea into your company’s culture. And it doesn’t even have to be about a coffee drink, either. Simply encourage employees to leave their desks, welcoming the idea that a fresh environment can inspire new and valuable thoughts.

Engaging others through stimulating conversation – caffeinated or not – is important. A quick sit down can allow for new concepts to brew and employees to mesh together, both of which will benefit your organization. Steven Johnson reinforces, “We take ideas from other people, from people we’ve learned from, from people we run into in the coffee shop, and we stitch them together into new forms and we create something new. That’s really where innovation happens.”

Why Companies Shouldn’t Limit Sick Days

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Here’s a simple idea from our CEO Tom Gardner: Stop providing limited sick days for your employees. It’s flu season, so Tom’s thoughts are all the more relevant – and urgent – now.

Match our yearlong approach at The Motley Fool: if an employee is feeling sick, tell them to please stay home. It seems like common sense, but Tom outlines four reasons why an unlimited sick policy is worth it in case you’re on the fence:

  1. Protect Your People.
  2. Extend Trust.
  3. Review Your Purpose.
  4. Manage to High Performance.

Instead of the flu, make freedom and trust contagious at your organization. To read more on Tom’s points, view his latest LinkedIn Influencer post here. And don’t be afraid to forward this information along to your CEO or Head of HR! Allowing employees to stay home when they’re ill will ultimately make your organization stronger – and much healthier.

Fool Speaker Series: Chris Guillebeau

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It took 11 years for Chris Guillebeau to complete his quest of visiting every country in the world. This staggering journey – which he viewed in the beginning as “really difficult but not fundamentally impossible,” led Chris to all 193 countries. The first 100 countries he visited – not counting layovers, by the way – cost $30,000. Though there was certainly a financial element involved, Chris prioritized his travels and reached this incredible goal by his 35th birthday.

Chris met an amazing community of people and gathered a treasure trove of stories, many of which are shared in his latest New York Times bestseller The Happiness of Pursuit. He features the quests of people like Lisa – the youngest person to circumnavigate the world by sailboat at age 16 – to a man who pursued a 17 year vow of silence. Check out what you can take from Chris – including his top pick for travel destination – in 60 seconds or less below!

*This post’s image was taken from Chris Guillebeau’s blog, The Art of Non-Conformity

PYOD: What’s That Mean?

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By Marshall Mabie

A few years ago, my then-boss Jeff was reviewing our IT team’s procedures for upgrading our users’ equipment. Traditionally, we would research the latest technology available, select the set-up that provided the most solutions for the largest numbers of our user base, and deploy a standard computer to Fools.

There was not a lot of initial personalization, which ended up causing a lot of later personalization after the machine was already in the user’s hands, which cost them time, and therefore money. Further, and more importantly, we weren’t serving our individual users’ needs as well as we could – they weren’t always empowered to use the technology that most helped them do what they want to do.

With that in mind, Jeff considered the possibilities, and decided to embrace a relatively new solution – Pick Your Own Device, or, as we call it, PYOD.

Instead of selecting a standard technology package and customizing it later, what if we treated every case as an individual, unique configuration? Moreover, what if we worked with each Fool individually to find the best technology tools for them? As a Windows-using office, what if Fools could use Apple products if they wanted to?

PYOD was born. Budgets were drawn up. Lists of test groups were created. Then Wave One of test groups. Then Wave Two. All in all, the first year of PYOD, we worked with 100 Fools to select their individually-tailored computers and tablets. We’re currently working with the next 100 Fools. Next year? Yup, 100 more Fools, ensuring the entire company will have new machines every three years.

It was a hit. And still is.

Fools have strong input as to what choices they have to do their work the best way possible, and we get a chance to sit down with the people we support and learn more about their jobs, how they do them, and how we can help them to do even better.

It also has provided our team with an opportunity for not just a deep knowledge-base about the technology our company uses, but also has allowed us to broaden our knowledge-base. No longer do we service only Mac or Windows machines; we work with both, providing us lots of opportunity to learn.

It’s an ongoing process that we refine and change as necessary, but at the heart of it, nothing has changed. Fools get a choice in selecting them to help them work the way they want to work. Our customers are served better, our company is served better, and that’s a win-win.