Motley Fool Workplace Culture in the News

We’ve been busy at The Motley Fool and reporters have taken notice. Here are a few stories we’ve appeared in recently that highlight some of the ways we’re trying to make Fools smarter, happier, and richer at work.

 

Inc Magazine

This Company Offered All of Its Employees $200 to Ask for a Raise

Yes, that’s right, we picked a day on the calendar and encouraged every Fool to ask for a raise. In fact, we paid them to ask for raise. Find out how the day went from the perspective of leadership and one of the Fools who asked for a raise.

 

LinkedIn Blog

How a “Foolish”Culture Became a Recruiting Powerhouse for This Finance Company

Wow! A recruiting powerhouse! LinkedIn takes a close look at our orientation process, how we built our Facetweetworthy culture, and more. With gifs!

 

 

Society for Human Resource Management Magazine

Profiles in Wellness: Four HR Leaders Taking a Holistic View

At The Motley Fool, we take employee health seriously. We know that everyone’s wellness journey is different and so, thanks to our Chief Wellness Officer Sam Whiteside, we offer as many opportunities as possible for all Fools to find their path to healthier living.

 

By the way, we are hiring, a lot! Check out all of our open positions at careers.fool.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Why Companies Shouldn’t Limit Sick Days

Here’s a simple idea from our CEO Tom Gardner: Stop providing limited sick days for your employees. It’s flu season, so Tom’s thoughts are all the more relevant – and urgent – now.

Match our yearlong approach at The Motley Fool: if an employee is feeling sick, tell them to please stay home. It seems like common sense, but Tom outlines four reasons why an unlimited sick policy is worth it in case you’re on the fence:

  1. Protect Your People.
  2. Extend Trust.
  3. Review Your Purpose.
  4. Manage to High Performance.

Instead of the flu, make freedom and trust contagious at your organization. To read more on Tom’s points, view his latest LinkedIn Influencer post here. And don’t be afraid to forward this information along to your CEO or Head of HR! Allowing employees to stay home when they’re ill will ultimately make your organization stronger – and much healthier.

Tom Gardner Talks Company Culture at GoogleHQ

“All of the greatest companies want their people to succeed.” It’s true! Learn more from Tom Gardner’s presentation at Google HQ about the importance of investing in your organization’s culture. Don’t have time to watch the video? Here are Tom’s four takeaways:

1. Name your own value.

2. Know everyone’s name at your company – learn as many name’s as possible.

3. Connect with people outside of your company.

4. Craft your own job.

To learn more about Tom’s points in detail, read his full article here.

A “Foolish” Thought about LinkedIn

LinkedIn

LinkedInI’m a firm believer in the power of LinkedIn. As the go-to Fool for PR and company-wide networking, LinkedIn is an absolutely crucial tool that I use every day. With it, I can search and dig through company rosters to ensure I’m reaching out to the right person for my specific request. I honestly can’t imagine doing my job without it.

Because it’s a network aimed at professionals, the growth of LinkedIn has brought with it a number of etiquette questions. For example: What should you post on your page? With whom should you connect? How should you describe yourself? And on and on.

On the subject of connecting, the best advice I’ve read is to use the “help test.” Ideally, you would be willing to help any of your “connections” if they reached out to you with a request. If that’s not the case, you might want to reconsider some of those connections. On the other hand, if you’re inviting someone to connect with you, and you don’t think they’d say yes if you reached out to them for help, it might be worth re-examining that invitation.

One of the more bewildering things I come across is what I call the “cold connection request.” Occasionally I’ll get an invitation from someone I don’t know, whom I’ve never spoken to or corresponded with in any capacity. The person might be in a similar field, but not necessarily. Either way, I’m hesitant to accept cold requests. You wouldn’t accept a face-to-face meeting with someone you didn’t know unless they gave you at least a little context, right?

If you ever find yourself needing to “cold connect” with someone, I highly suggest tailoring the invitation. LinkedIn allows you to write your own invitation instead of using the standard “I’d like to add you to my professional network.” If someone personalizes the invitation, it shows me that they at least care enough to put some thought into why they’re reaching out to me.

To be sure, I’m not looking for anything fancy. Just tell me something about who you are and why you wanted to connect with me, and I’d be much more likely to respond. It’s a low bar, really.

As you build out your networks on LinkedIn, be thoughtful about who you include. After all, a well-constructed LinkedIn network can be a powerful tool when it comes time to ask for help. Just make sure that your connections are people who’d be willing to help you, and vice versa. You’ll have more success that way. I promise.